My trip in Netherlands, last day

We spent the last day in Netherlands visiting Utrecht, to which we haven’t given the right importance.

Utrecht was founded by the Romans in 47 AD to protect an important position for the crossing of the river Rhine.

This city was the first in the Netherlands to embrace the Catholic faith, and in the Middle Ages it became an important religious center, extending its control over most of the Netherlands until 1527.

The city center preserves many medieval churches and monasteries, which are now next to modern architectural complexes.

The Oudegracht, the old canal, passes through the city 5 meters below street level. Beautiful is the Domtoren, which is a masterpiece of Gothic architecture, and represents, with its 112 m, one of the tallest towers in the Netherlands. This tower dominates Utrecht, and from its top you have the best view of the city.

Near the tower stands the Cathedral, Domkerk, whose construction began in 1254, it is here that the Union of Utrecht was signed in 1579 by John the Count of Nassau, brother of William of Orange.

After this brief visit to the city, after lunch we had to head towards the Eindhoven airport, leaving for now this beautiful country, so characteristic and full of traditions.

My trip in Netherlands, third day

We spent the penultimate day of our holiday in the museum quarter, as we had booked a visit to the Van Gogh museum in the afternoon.

In the morning we took the opportunity to visit the neighbourhood, and then we headed to the Vondelpark for a picnic.

The Vondelpark is an English park of about 48 hectares open to the public in June 1865. Inside, ducks, birds, squirrels and hedgehogs enliven the park along with over 10 million visitors a year.

After relaxing in the green and in the nature, despite being in the center of the fantastic Amsterdam, we headed towards the Van Gogh Museum. Before we get there, however, we made a detour to Bagels and Beans, a fantastic place where you can eat bagels of all tastes. As far as I’m concerned I have chosen a cinnamon bagels filled with butter and peanut butter, very fat but delicious. The only flaw … the espresso, but for us Italians, I will not tell you anything new.

In the afternoon we visited the Van Gogh Museum, divided into three floors that start from the most youthful works to the more recent ones. In some points it was not clear the route and then we went over several times in some rooms, apart from this the paintings are amazing.

Once out, we continued to visit the museum area and its canals, although, I have to say that the quarter museum is much more residential than the centre, while remaining characteristic.

Before returning to Utrecht, however, we stopped in a brewery, Biercafe Gollem, to finish in the best way the day. A beautiful orange cat welcomed me, sleeping on the counter, so the day couldn’t have ended in a better way.

 

My trip in Netherlands, second day

The next day of our trip, we decided to go back to Amsterdam. First we went to the tourist information point, which is located opposite the central station, to get information on how to reach the characteristic areas with windmills. A very kind gentleman suggests us as a destination Zaanse Schans, a tourist town that is located in the north of Amsterdam. So, following his instructions we took a train that in 20 minutes brought us to this lovely town, where you can breathe the true essence of the Dutch soul.

Zaanse Schans is a small community located on the quay of the river Zaan. Part of the city was created in 1960 to illustrate the life in a village of seventeenth-century. The shops, houses, mills, historical buildings of the entire Zaan region have been relocated here to recreate a village-museum in which one lives and works. In fact, people are dedicated to the maintenance of Dutch traditions. Here the inhabitants themselves operate the mills, it seems to go back in time and live a fairy tale.

Once finished the tour in the village, we moved to the residential area called Zaandijk where there are some local places where to have lunch. We chose the pub Proeflokaal De Kruis, where we were greeted in a very kind by both the owner and the waitress, who served us promptly and very politely.

In Holland it is not easy to eat typical dishes, as it happens in Italy, or maybe we did not have the time, however here we ate sandwiches with flavors and smells typical of the Nordic countries.

Tommaso chose a sandwich with an extra-large meatball spiced with dill, accompanied by pickles and mustard, while for me pulled chicken with paprika and with a flavoured salad that cooled the whole. Finally, excellent beer at will.

Holland in love ❤

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After lunch we returned to Amsterdam and we were wandering around the city until evening, visiting coffee shops and gouda shops, which I discovered to be a very good cheese!

 

My trip in Netherlands, first day

Hi everyone,

in this post I would like to tell you about my experience in Netherlands, happened during the month may.

I flew to Amsterdam with my boyfriend on Thursday 24th may, and we are back on Sunday 27th may. Unfortunately, it was just a hit and run but it was just worth it.

We have left from Bologna airport at 10.15 a.m. on Thursday 24th, to land at 12.15 p.m. at Eindhoven airport.

From here we took the bus to reach Utrecht, city that we have chosen to stay during this long weekend. At the beginning, we would have liked to stay in Amsterdam, but you know how are the finances of archaeologists. So we opted for this city and it was a great choice! Our decision has fallen on Luxury Apartments, apartments located in a residential context. We have chosen to stay in apartment to be more independent and not have any kind of connection with breakfast, lunch or dinner at the hotel.

From the apartment the Utrecht Central Station is 10-minute walk away, and from there the trains leave for Amsterdam every 10 minutes, which is half an hour away by train.

So once the luggage and we were settled, we took the first train for Amsterdam to get to the spectacular Melkweg!

The Melkweg (“Milky Way”) is a famous concert hall and cultural center of Amsterdam, as well as a former hippy meeting point. It is located near Leidseplein, the central square in the area where most of the city night entertainments are concentrated.

The building was previously a workshop and is currently divided into several rooms of various sizes, in fact in addition to the large concert hall, there is a room intended for theatrical and dance performances, a cinema, a room for photographic exhibitions and one for multi-media art events. The Melkweg is run by a non-profit organization founded in 1970.

At the Melkweg, that evening, my favorite singer-songwriter of the moment was playing, Michael Malarkey, multifaceted artist who opened the tour of his fantastic album “Mongrels” in Amsterdam. We had chosen these dates without knowing the first stop of his tour, it was destiny to see him again after the concert of Rome.

mornin fam • • • #Repost @anneverhoef ・・・

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From the Amsterdam Central Station to the Melkweg it took 30 minutes of walking to get there. In this half an hour, we enjoyed the view of the canals and the beautiful and characteristic Amsterdam houses at sunset.

To be continued, stay tune…

My first scientific article

Hi guys!

As you have already seen from Instagram stories and images posted on my profile, I am working on pipelines between Pavia and Lodi in Italy at the moment.

But today I would like to tell you about my University career and my first scientific article.
I am graduated in “Research, documentation and preservation of the archaeological heritage” at the University of Bologna, with a Master thesis entitled “Morphological and morphometric analysis of Torrener Bärenhöhle’s Paleolithic human tooth (Salzburg)” with Dr. Stefano Benazzi, getting the highest grade (110 cum laude).
At the beginning of my career I have focused my attention on the archaeological field. In fact I have dug in many places, most of them were Medieval sites, but I have dug too in a protohistoric site, the necropolis of Sinaw in the Sultanate of Oman.
After my return from Oman I have started my internship at the Anthropological Laboratory and in this period I have learned the basic skills for the study of human remains.
Later I have started the project of my Master thesis about morphological description and morphometric analyses of Torrener Bärenhöhle’s human tooth. During this period, I acquired solid knowledge of paleoanthropology and virtual anthropology as various digital techniques to analyse human remains. For the project of my thesis I have been in the Department of Human Evolution at the Max Plank Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, thanks to a scholarship I won, to segment fossils comparison sample.
After my graduation I have started to write the article about the thesis that was published on the Journal of Human Evolution in 2016.
The tooth was found in a cave near Salzburg called Torrener Bärenhöhle, located by an alpine guide in 1924. In the cave were found mainly animal bones belonging to Ursus spaleus, hence the name of the cave, in fact Bärenhöhle means cave bear. Most of this bones were manipulated by humans, for this reason this place was interpreted as a place for bear hunting.
The first publication of the tooth was in 1971, when the tooth was classified as Homo sapiens, but in 1991 Mr. Urbanek attributed it to Homo neanderthalensis for the material culture of the cave. The need to classify this tooth stems from these controversies.
In this contribution, I investigated the tooth from Torrener Bärenhöhle’s cave. This tooth was micro-CT scanned to digitally study its external and internal morphology, and sampled for AMS radiocarbon dating to establish its taxonomy and chronology.

For more read my article on this link and my poster.

O(perative)S(ystem)-Culture.org a CMS for archaeology

The thesis on the O(perative)S(ystem)-Culture.org project was finally discussed on March 21th 2018 by Tommaso Saccone, my partner in crime, in work and life. 

Fifty years have passed since the first computers and IT tools were adopted in the archaeological field for study and research activities.

In fact, in the 60s of the last century, the Professor Maurizio Tosi with the archaeological mission (ISMEO – ISIAO) in Shahr-i Sokhta (Iran) began to use the first computers for the elaboration of databases for the organization of the archaeological record using the historical formats .db3.

Since then, technology has made great strides, in fact from table .db3 we have moved to complex and articulated Geo Databases that can contain terabytes of heterogeneous data, all geo referenced and in constant relation between them.

Soon, tools such as 3D modelling, the development of GIS and BIM, for the study of the territory, will also give great impetus to the methodology of archaeological documentation thus aligning with the European directives that manage spatial planning and public works.

There are two questions that have been the starting point of this project:

  • How to acquire, process and communicate this vast and heterogeneous core of data?
  • How to archive this data to make it immediately reusable?

They have tried to answer these questions by developing a tool for archiving and communicating the archaeological and cultural data “O (prerative) S (ystem) -Culture.org”, a CMS useful to communicate the complexity of archaeological data thanks to digital technologies.

The idea for this project was born in 2012, in collaboration with the Professor Maurizio Tosi, who would soon retire, and who wanted to find a way to make the data acquired during his career accessible.

To date OS-Culture.org has been used to organize: part of Professor Tosi’s personal archives and for the management and communication of archaeological data and information from the Italian Archaeological Mission in Armenia and the Caucasus (MAA-ISMEO) and from the Institute of Archeology of Yerevan – Armenia (IAE NAS RA).

Following the Bachelor thesis of Tommaso Saccone “GIS software in comparison: the case of the Pieve di Santa Reparata, Terra del Sole (FC)”, it was decided to continue working with open source software to keep production costs low and at the same time have the possibility to modify the source code, so, if necessary, to adapt the software to the needs of the OS-Culture.org project.

The final goal of OS-Culture.org is to offer an instrument, from simple and immediate use, that allows the complete management of the archaeological documentation process, always maintaining the authorship of the data.

If you want read more use this link http://os-culture.org/file-download/OperativeSystem-Culture_Project_eng.pdf.

My experience in Ostia Antica

Saturday, March 10th, me and my colleague of the Minerva Association were to visit the archaeological park of Ostia Antica.

While we were making tickets, I decided to buy a small guide called “Ostia Antica: a port for Rome” with annexed reconstructions. The guide initially presents the index and a map, then follows a brief introduction to the various phases of the site, and a brief explanation for each location of the route even if they are not told all the places that will meet during the visit.

According to the literature, the city of Ostia was founded by King Anco Marcio at the end of the VII century BC. However, the most ancient structures brought to light during the archaeological research can be dated back to the beginning of the IV century BC. It is hypothesized that the realization occurred at a time after the conquest of Veio, Etruscan center, completed in 396 BC. The excavations also returned findings and traces of huts related to an earlier phase, probably dated to V century BC.

So, it is very probable that there existed an initial foundation of Ostia, perhaps to be found in an area not yet explored. Certain is the antiquity of the frequentation of the area, justified by the significant role that this part of the left bank of the Tiber covered in the salt trade. Here, there was the last part of the salary route which was of vital importance for the Sabine populations, who could only reach the salt flats at the mouths of the Tiber just by following it. Since the VIII-VII BC. Rome showed interest in this strategic importance. in fact, it is necessary to read in the struggles between Romans against Latins and Etruscans the intention to extend the roman dominion to the sea, followed by Ostia foundation in the VII century BC. that represent the reflection of this historical reality.

The archaeological site is truly spectacular, unique and immense. Unfortunately, these exceptional characteristics are not totally enhanced by the path itself. First, the whole area is dirty and overwhelmed by vegetation. The trail is not reported, except for the architectural structures that run along the decumanus, but beyond these other fantastic areas, even though they are marked on the map, sometimes there are unattainable or in other cases have led us to get lost along the way. Moreover, many areas we have not been able to visit because they are not very well signposted. Second, almost all the mosaics, especially the most important, are protected by sheets, and therefore not appreciable.

Halfway around you can stop, in fact the park offers a refreshment point, services and bookshop. In front of this area there is the Ostiense museum, where the statues found during the excavations are preserved, like the original copy of the statue of Minerva-Vittoria, found at the attic of Porta Romana, dated to the I century AD, or as the statue of the Emperor Trajan, found at the Schola di Traiano, dated to the II century AD.

After the break we continued for another two hours inside the park. Following the decumanus and appreciating all the structures along the main road. In a branch of the decumanus, in via della Foce, we lost between Casa di Amore e Psiche and the Temple of Hercules. For this reason we appreciating very quickly the Christian Basilica, the Schola del Traiano and all those the whole thing located on the opposite side of the decumanus, unable to finally visit the Synagogue which is the last of the buildings.
The experience was magnificent but an archaeological park of that size and importance would deserve greater attention to communication as well as the site itself.

My first archaeological excavation … my first love

Hi Guys,

today I want to tell you about my first archaeological excavation, which took place in 2009, the Parish of Santa Reparata (FC-Italy).

This excavation not only made me realize how much I really loved archaeology and excavation, but it made me fall in love with the Middle Ages, the Christianization of countryside and the burials, even though in this excavation I still didn’t know how much really loved these latter XD.

At the beginnings I really felt like a fish out of water, like a child who was on the first day of school. I was already at the first year of University, and so I was settling into a new routine, a new city and new people, I just missed being a digger freshman XD.

But as in all situations I settled in a few days, not only to live with many strangers bigger than me, but also in the worksite, showing so much willpower and physics, although I was so thin at that time … but as we know in archaeology it is not a question of force, but a question of levers.

This was my first great love that I will carry forever in my heart. This excavation was so complete that it was the best didactic excavation that I’ve ever done, I could use techniques that would now be defined as “obsolete”, but which are at the base of all the innovative documentation techniques used nowadays.

Precisely for these reasons, at the third year of the University I decided to do my Bachelor thesis on the Parish of Santa Reparata, concentrating especially on the study of burials, both from a taphonomic and physical point of view.

I leave you with a summary of the excavation campaigns.

The Parish of Santa Reparata is located between the villages of Terra del Sole and Castrocaro Terme (FC).

The study of the church was divided into two excavation campaigns, conducted in 2006 and 2009.

This parish is a certificate of considerable importance in the architectural panorama of Romagna. This is because despite the changes in purpose of use of the building of worship, the original structure and the peculiar characteristics of Romanesque art are clearly present.

The archaeological excavation has highlighted the presence of a complex settlement, characterized by the prolonged occupation of the site from the Roman age. In fact, in this phase there is the presence of a small apsed room, probably to refer to a larger villa.

The construction of a cruciform-shaped cult building, articulated in a central nave culminating in a circular apse with two lateral rooms, is due to late antiquity. Inside and outside the church there is a cemetery area dating back to the VI-VII century. The cruciform church remains in use for a long time, so much to be identifiable with the early medieval church mentioned in the written sources of the X century.

During the medieval phase the church is divided into a system with three naves divided by six bays supported by five pairs of cruciform pillars. There is also a cemetery area adjacent to the facade and the north aisle.

The subsequent Romanesque phase is evidenced by the presence of traces of a vast crypt originally placed under the presbytery of the central nave but probably also present in the terminal part of the side aisles. During the construction of the church, a bell casting system was built in the nave in front of the crypt.

During the Renaissance the parish underwent the drastic reduction of the volumes to a single part of the central nave, which was decorated with a cycle of frescoes, and a raised presbytery emphasized by a stairway and serene stone capitals with a floral motif to support the cross-vaulting roof.

The consecration of the homonymous church of Santa Reparata, during the XVII century, inside the Medicean citadel of Santa Reparata probably marked the end of the rural parish that was gradually demolished and intended for residential and agricultural use.

Sources

Margherita C., 2012, The burials of the parish of Santa Reparata (FC), Bachelor thesis, University of Bologna

http://www.fastionline.org/

Hello everyone, here I am!

Hi!

I am Cristiana and I am an archaeologist.

I wanted to create a blog that would tell the real life of an archaeologist. Why do I say “real” life? Well because in general the archaeologist is a figure of other times, an adventurer looking for something mysterious, that wanders in dangerous places and far from our everyday life. Think of Indiana Jones, Relic Hunter or Treasure Guardians. No, the real archaeologist doesn’t use either weapons or whips, nor does he have to deal with unpleasant or paranormal situations.

The real archaeologist works in our beautiful cities, supporting large public and private works, such as construction of pipelines, the district heating network, or even highways.

Would you ever have imagined it?!

Precisely for this reason I felt the need to create a space that would explain and really tell what the archaeologist does, just to make public understand how important and beautiful this profession is, but above all, to emphasize that this craft exists and, why despite what you think, it hasn’t yet been discovered all in the world …